He became what we are, so that we might become what He is

EYE hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.

1 Corinthians 2:9

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A c. 12th century fresco in Cappadocia, of the Adoration of the Magi. From Wikimedia Commons.

A c. 12th century fresco in Cappadocia, of the Adoration of the Magi. From Wikimedia Commons.

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CALL to mind who He is; and what He became for our sakes. …

All the penalties imposed by divine judgment upon man for the sin of the first transgression – death, toil, hunger, thirst and the like – He took upon Himself, becoming what we are, so that we might become what He is.

The Logos became man, so that man might become Logos.

Being rich, He became poor for our sakes, so that through His poverty we might become rich (cf. 2 Cor 8:9).

In His great love for man He became like us, so that through every virtue we might become like Him.

St Mark the Ascetic, Letter to Nicolas the Solitary. Source.

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I POUR out my prayer unto the Lord, and unto him make I my troubles known; for my soul is filled with evils, and my life cometh near unto Hades; and like unto Jonah I beseech him: O God, bring me up out of corruption.

AT this heaven was amazed, and the ends of the earth were afraid: that God appeared in the flesh unto men, and thy womb became more spacious than the heavens. Therefore the princes among angels and men magnify thee, O Theotokos.

On Thursdays of the Plagal of the Fourth Tone. Source.

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2 thoughts on “He became what we are, so that we might become what He is

  1. “thy womb became more spacious than the heavens” that is the most beautiful sentence I’ve read in a while! I am really enjoying being continually reminded of the Great Love God had for us in sending us Jesus through Mother Mary. I think all your posts contain that ultimate essence, and that’s why I keep coming back! That is one story that you never get tired of hearing over, and over again.

  2. Thanks, lilyboat. The Greek liturgy revels in paradox. I think that is why it is so transforming: it simply invites us to gaze in wonder like the angels, and the heart is filled with light.

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